Law in the News: Supreme Court voids abortion clinic protest-free zone

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Supreme Court unanimously struck down the 35-foot protest-free zone outside abortion clinics in Massachusetts Thursday, declaring it an unconstitutional restraint on the free-speech rights of protesters.

Authorities have less intrusive ways to deal with potential confrontations or other problems that can arise outside clinics, Chief Justice John Roberts wrote. Roberts noted that most of the problems reported by police and the clinics in Massachusetts occurred outside a single Planned Parenthood facility in Boston, and only on Saturdays when the largest crowds typically gather.

“For a problem shown to arise only once a week in one city at one clinic, creating 35-foot buffer zones at every clinic across the Commonwealth is hardly a narrowly tailored solution,” Roberts said. He wrote the majority opinion after asking no questions — exceedingly rare for him — at the argument in January.

Read article on SF Chronicle

 

Law in the News: Supreme Court Says Phones Can’t Be Searched Without a Warrant

WASHINGTON — In a major statement on privacy rights in the digital age, the Supreme Court on Wednesday unanimously ruled that the police need warrants to search the cellphones of people they arrest. Chief Justice John G. Roberts Jr., writing for the court, said the vast amount of data contained on modern cellphones must be protected from routine inspection.
Read article on the NY Times.

Law in the News: Obama to Congress: I don’t need new permission on Iraq

Washington (CNN) — I’ll let you know what’s going on, but I don’t need new congressional authority to act, President Barack Obama told congressional leaders Wednesday about his upcoming decision on possible military intervention in Iraq.

The White House meeting sounded more like a listening session for the top Republicans and Democrats in the House and Senate about options for helping Iraq’s embattled Shiite government halt the lightning advance of Sunni Islamist fighters toward Baghdad that Obama is considering.

According to a White House statement, Obama went over U.S. efforts to “strengthen the capacity of Iraq’s security forces to confront the threat” from the Islamic State in Iraq and Syria (ISIS) fighters, “including options for increased security assistance.”

Earlier, spokesman Jay Carney spelled out one limit to any U.S. help, saying: “The President hasn’t ruled out anything except sending U.S. combat troops into Iraq.”
Read article on CNN.

Why didn’t anyone vote in California on Tuesday?

Even low turnout in California means lots of voters due to the state’s sheer size. But California has historically overperformed in primary races. We anticipated over 5 million voters when we wrote about the primary on Monday, based on historic trends. Instead, only about 3.2 million people voted according to preliminary counts, plunging turnout to 18.3 percent of the state’s registered voters.
Read article on Washington Post.

Law in the News: Supreme Court agrees to hear potentially groundbreaking Maryland tax case

The Supreme Court announced Tuesday that it will hear arguments in a Maryland case that could rewrite tax laws across the country and cost Montgomery County and other localities hundreds of millions in revenue if it decides for the plaintiffs.

The issue in Maryland v. Wynne is the extent to which a state can tax income that residents earn in another state. Maryland allows residents to deduct income taxes paid to other states on their Maryland income tax forms. But that deduction doesn’t apply to income tax the state collects on behalf of counties and some municipalities — what is known as the piggyback tax.

Read article on the Washington Post

Collection Highlight: Animal Law Databases

Get your research started with the Animal LAW Subject Guide, for print and online resources available at UC Hastings and elsewhere:

http://librarysource.uchastings.edu/sp/subjects/guide.php?subject=animal-law

Databases at UC Hastings: http://librarysource.uchastings.edu/sp/subjects/databases.php

HeinOnline Law Journals: Animal Law Articles

Full-text access to more than 1,500 law journals.

Environmental Law Reporter
A tool to search laws about the environment, natural resources, energy, health and safety, and land use, containing original source documents, editorial summaries, and expert analysis. Includes news and analysis, updates, litigation, and laws and regulations, among other items.

Databases at the San Francisco Public Library

Available to San Francisco Public Library cardholders. http://sfpl.org/index.php?pg=2000028601

JSTOR
Full-text access to over 1,000 academic journals across the humanities, social sciences, and sciences, as well as select monographs. Available through the SFPL with an SFPL library card.

Free Databases

Suggested keywords: Animal Experimentation; Animal Law and legislation; Animal welfare; Animal Rights; Dog Law; Domestic animal Law; Endangered Species; Wildlife

Google Scholar

Google Scholar searches multiple academic databases simultaneously.  Search results include a citator to rank the influence of each article.

Google Books

Free text of books scanned by Google. May contain either the entire text of the book, or sample pages to assist you to determine a book’s content.

World Catalog

Click a books’ record and enter your zip code to find nearby libraries that hold the book. For specific topics, enter keywords in the basic search field

Crash Course on Legal Research class today! 5/14, 5:30 – 7:00 PM, Classroom K (198 Building)

 Please RSVP to libref@uchastings.edu by 4 pm today (Wednesday, May 14.)

Have a summer job? Need to brush up on your legal research skills?  The UC Hastings Law Library is offering a Crash Course on Legal Research focused on the practical skills you’ll need to get started on your first assignment. Come by after work on Wednesday, May 14, for pizza and expert advice.

1Ls, 2Ls, and graduates welcome. 

May 14, 5:30 – 7:00 PM

Classroom K of the 198 Building.