Category Archives: Articles of Interest

UMN Libraries’ Umbra Search African American History makes Black history freely available online

The University of Minnesota Libraries, in partnership with the Penumbra Theatre Company, is launching Umbra Search African American History, a free and openly available online search tool that facilitates broad access to over 400,000 digitized archival materials documenting African American history from more than 1,000 libraries, archives, and cultural heritage institutions across the United States.

Read full article on umn.edu

President Obama’s vast social media archive goes live with 250,000 posts, photos and videos

The White House, in partnership with ArchiveSocial, announced on Thursday that an archive of eight years of Obama social postings have been made available online. The database contains more than 250,000 posts, photos and videos shared by more than 100 official Obama White House social media profiles including the president’s @POTUS Twitter timeline, the official White House Facebook page, and the First Lady’s Instagram feed.

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Merrick Garland Is Named As President Obama’s Supreme Court Nominee

Federal appeals court judge Merrick Garland is President Obama’s pick to fill the Supreme Court seat left vacant by the late Supreme Court Justice Antonin Scalia.

The president officially named Garland as a Supreme Court nominee Wednesday as they stood before the media and a large gathering of attendees in the Rose Garden at the White House. Read article on NPR

SCOTUS blog: Supreme Court vacancy on Scalia’s Death

SCOTUS blog has a special section to news relating to Justice Antonin Scalia’s death this past Saturday, and President Obama’s possible Supreme Court nominees. Read the blog posts here.

Bluebook Revision Wars

From the Washington Post, Feb. 9, 2016:

“War is brewing over the most boring piece of intellectual property imaginable: the “Bluebook,” the 580-page quasi-authoritative source of proper legal citation formats published by the Harvard Law Review, described by Adam Liptak of the New York Times a few months ago as “a comically elaborate thicket of random and counterintuitive rules about how to cite judicial decisions, law review articles and the like [that] is both grotesque and indispensable.

Students at NYU Law School have prepared a new, streamlined, open-access citation system and gotten it ready for publication…”

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Law in the News: The Biggest Calif. Court Decisions So Far In 2015

The California Supreme Court handed down a series of far-reaching decisions in the first half of the year that lawyers say will trigger more challenges to pay-for-delay pharmaceutical patent settlements under state antitrust law, empower cities to impose affordable housing requirements on builders and give state courts greater leeway to reject arbitration awards in employment and consumer disputes.

Here’s a closer look at five significant rulings from the first six months of 2015.

Read article on Law360

Law in the News: California Vaccine exemption bill temporarily stalls in California Senate Education Committee

Facing a barrage of questions he could not answer from his Senate Education Committee colleagues — particularly about the right of California children to attend public schools even if they are unvaccinated — Sen. Richard Pan on Wednesday agreed to delay by one week the committee’s vote on his controversial vaccine legislation.

The unexpected retreat seemed a promising turn of events for hundreds of opponents who again showed up in the Capitol to challenge lawmakers and insist the bill would deprive them of their right to choose not to vaccinate their children. And some believe the delay could imperil the chances of the legislation’s passage.

Pan, a pediatrician, co-authored Senate Bill 277, which would repeal the state’s personal belief exemption and require that only children who have been immunized for diseases such as measles and whooping cough be admitted to a school in California. It would also require schools to notify parents of immunization rates at their children’s schools.

Read article at the San Jose Mercury News.