Category Archives: Federal law

President Obama’s vast social media archive goes live with 250,000 posts, photos and videos

The White House, in partnership with ArchiveSocial, announced on Thursday that an archive of eight years of Obama social postings have been made available online. The database contains more than 250,000 posts, photos and videos shared by more than 100 official Obama White House social media profiles including the president’s @POTUS Twitter timeline, the official White House Facebook page, and the First Lady’s Instagram feed.

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Merrick Garland Is Named As President Obama’s Supreme Court Nominee

Federal appeals court judge Merrick Garland is President Obama’s pick to fill the Supreme Court seat left vacant by the late Supreme Court Justice Antonin Scalia.

The president officially named Garland as a Supreme Court nominee Wednesday as they stood before the media and a large gathering of attendees in the Rose Garden at the White House. Read article on NPR

SCOTUS blog: Supreme Court vacancy on Scalia’s Death

SCOTUS blog has a special section to news relating to Justice Antonin Scalia’s death this past Saturday, and President Obama’s possible Supreme Court nominees. Read the blog posts here.

Law in the News: Clinton e-mail flap reveals common practice

Reports this week that Hillary Rodham Clinton relied on her personal account entirely, and did not even have a government e-mail address during her tenure as secretary of state, have triggered a firestorm over the accountability of public officials and the security of valuable information. It turns out Jeb Bush had a personal account, too, while governor of Florida.

Both used their own digital servers, revealing the high degree of personal control they held over all their official e-mails.

The disclosures highlight an ethical controversy in all levels of government and underscore just how easily politicians can set up systems that operate beyond the scrutiny of the public they were elected to serve.
Read article on Boston Globe

Law in the News: Court dismisses 3rd lawsuit against hen cage law

SAN FRANCISCO (AP) — A federal appeals court on Wednesday upheld a decision to dismiss a lawsuit by a farmer that challenged a law banning the inhumane confinement of egg-laying hens.

The 9th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals affirmed the 2012 decision by a lower court to throw out the lawsuit by egg farmer William Cramer. Cramer’s lawsuit said the law is unconstitutionally vague.

It’s the third time courts have rejected lawsuits by egg farmers against California’s landmark Proposition 2.

The initiative approved in 2008 bans the inhumane confinement of egg-laying hens, breeding pigs and veal calves in cages so small the animals cannot stretch their limbs, lie down or turn around.

Read article on San Francisco Chronicles

Law in the News: Obama, in Tennessee, Begins Selling His Community College Tuition Plan

In California, community college tuition and fees average less than $1,500 a year, the lowest in the nation, and with government grants, most students pay nothing. In Florida and Michigan, the cost is over $3,000, yet poorer students still attend free. But in Vermont and New Hampshire, prices are around $7,000, well over what government grants cover.

That broad range means that President Obama’s proposal to make community college tuition-free nationwide — if Congress and the states were to embrace it — would benefit every student of the two-year colleges, but that far greater benefits would go to students in the states with the highest tuition. And while it would aid the economically hard-pressed, it would also effectively extend federal aid to millions of middle- and upper-income students who do not qualify for it currently.
Read full article in New York Times.

Law in the News: Foie Gras Producers, Restaurants Defeat California Ban

A California ban on foie gras can’t be enforced because it violates U.S. poultry regulations, a federal judge said in a victory for producers of the delicacy made from fattened duck and goose livers.

The ban, which took effect in 2012, was the first by a state to make it illegal to sell foie gras. Animal-rights advocates supported the ban, arguing that force-feeding ducks and geese with a tube inserted in the esophagus to fatten their livers was cruel.

U.S. District Judge Stephen Wilson in Los Angeles agreed with American and Canadian producers and a restaurant group suing to overturn the prohibition that the federal Poultry Products Inspection Act preempts California from imposing its own rules on poultry ingredients and sales.
Read the article on Bloomberg.com