Category Archives: Uncategorized

New Study Room Reservation Process

Sign up for study rooms starting Wednesday, November 25th, 2015, for use of rooms beginning Wednesday, November 25th, 2015 until December 18th, 2015!

(A minimum of 3 students is required to reserve a study room)

To reserve a study room, sign into the  Astra Room Reservation Schedule using your Hastings email (omit @uchastings.edu) and password, click “Scheduling Grid” on the main page, and choose “Study Room Calendar”from the “Choose Calendar” drop down menu at the top right of the grid. Then complete the following steps:

 

  • Read the complete S15 Study Room Reservations instructions before making your first reservation.
  • Select a date using the calendar.
  • Select an available timeslot and room. Please refer to the Thanksgiving Holiday Building Hours and Exam Period Building Hours (sent out to students in an email from Student Services) before settling on a time. Pay special attention to the instructions regarding when reservations begin for weekdays (even hours) or weekends (odd hours).
  • Follow the instructions on how to schedule into a seminar room exactly.
  • Please title all study room reservations using your FULL NAME.
  • Click “Send Notification” to submit your reservation and send yourself a notification.

Rules for Study Rooms

 

Why Digitizing Harvard’s Law Library May Not Improve Access to Justice

The project, known as “Free the Law,” made waves because Harvard’s collection is second only to the Library of Congress in its breadth. Since most of this material was either unavailable or only available through a paywall, Free the Law has tremendous potential. But whom will it help the most?

https://bol.bna.com/why-digitizing-harvards-law-library-may-not-improve-access-to-justice/

The Debate of Whether to Ban Law Student Use of Laptops During Class

A Game Changer: Assessing the Impact of the Princeton/UCLA Laptop Study on the Debate of Whether to Ban Law Student Use of Laptops During Class raises another chapter in the continuing debate regarding whether students should be permitted to use their laptops in class. Prior to the Princeton/UCLA study, the debate primarily centered around the distractive effects which laptops had on both laptop users who were engaged in activities unrelated to what was being discussed in class, and on their classmates who were sitting nearby and were distracted by the visuals and sounds emanating from the laptops. Such distractions included surfing the Internet, playing video games, and emailing others in the class.

This study reveals that even if these distractions are removed, students who use their laptops for note taking tend to simply type, verbatim, the words of their professor, without trying to understand the meaning of what their professor is actually saying. As a result, their comprehension and retention suffers.

http://ssrn.com/abstract=2554535