Legal Research Certificate classes

Learn in-depth legal research with our library research certificate program! Classes are held on Tuesdays at noon. Classes left this term are: Administrative law; Free and alternative resources; Conducting precision searching.

Check Blackboard for the full list of classes with days, times and location, and find program information at http://library.uchastings.edu/services/certificate.php

Law in the News: Court dismisses 3rd lawsuit against hen cage law

SAN FRANCISCO (AP) — A federal appeals court on Wednesday upheld a decision to dismiss a lawsuit by a farmer that challenged a law banning the inhumane confinement of egg-laying hens.

The 9th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals affirmed the 2012 decision by a lower court to throw out the lawsuit by egg farmer William Cramer. Cramer’s lawsuit said the law is unconstitutionally vague.

It’s the third time courts have rejected lawsuits by egg farmers against California’s landmark Proposition 2.

The initiative approved in 2008 bans the inhumane confinement of egg-laying hens, breeding pigs and veal calves in cages so small the animals cannot stretch their limbs, lie down or turn around.

Read article on San Francisco Chronicles

Law in the News: Judge tosses challenge to SF ‘Airbnb law’ but future suits likely

Just days before San Francisco’s “Airbnb law” is scheduled to take effect, a federal judge on Wednesday dismissed a challenge to the law from rival vacation-rental firm HomeAway but left the door open for HomeAway customers to file their own lawsuit.

The ordinance legalizes and regulates vacation-rentals in private homes. HomeAway claimed that it was tailored for Airbnb’s business model and asked for a preliminary injunction to stop it from taking effect Sunday. That implementation date can go forward, the court ruled.

HomeAway’s objections focused on residency and tax requirements.

Most of the 1,200 San Francisco rentals advertised on HomeAway and its subsidiary VRBO are second homes, whose owners live elsewhere and thus don’t meet the permanent residency requirement. And the law said that “hosting platforms” must collect and remit San Francisco’s 14 percent hotel tax. HomeAway argued that it is not a middleman like Airbnb, which handles the entire rental transaction, but merely a marketplace — more like Craigslist or the newspaper classifieds — where homeowners can list the spaces.

Read full article on SFGate

Legal Research Certificate classes start Tuesday!

Classes for the LRC start today! Classes are held on Tuesdays at noon. Classes include researching secondary sources, statutes, case law, international law, California legislative history, administrative law, free & alternative resources, and conducting precision searching.

Check Blackboard for the full list of classes with days, times and location. More information on how to enroll and certificate requirements can be found on Blackboard and at http://library.uchastings.edu/services/certificate.php

Law in the News: Obama, in Tennessee, Begins Selling His Community College Tuition Plan

In California, community college tuition and fees average less than $1,500 a year, the lowest in the nation, and with government grants, most students pay nothing. In Florida and Michigan, the cost is over $3,000, yet poorer students still attend free. But in Vermont and New Hampshire, prices are around $7,000, well over what government grants cover.

That broad range means that President Obama’s proposal to make community college tuition-free nationwide — if Congress and the states were to embrace it — would benefit every student of the two-year colleges, but that far greater benefits would go to students in the states with the highest tuition. And while it would aid the economically hard-pressed, it would also effectively extend federal aid to millions of middle- and upper-income students who do not qualify for it currently.
Read full article in New York Times.

Law in the News: Foie Gras Producers, Restaurants Defeat California Ban

A California ban on foie gras can’t be enforced because it violates U.S. poultry regulations, a federal judge said in a victory for producers of the delicacy made from fattened duck and goose livers.

The ban, which took effect in 2012, was the first by a state to make it illegal to sell foie gras. Animal-rights advocates supported the ban, arguing that force-feeding ducks and geese with a tube inserted in the esophagus to fatten their livers was cruel.

U.S. District Judge Stephen Wilson in Los Angeles agreed with American and Canadian producers and a restaurant group suing to overturn the prohibition that the federal Poultry Products Inspection Act preempts California from imposing its own rules on poultry ingredients and sales.
Read the article on Bloomberg.com